Including images in your press release is a good way to capture someone’s attention and reel them in so that they read the rest of your press release. Since our attention span has dropped to 8 seconds, you have only 8 seconds to pique your readers’ interest and persuade them to keep reading what you have to say. With a good selection of images, you can not only capture attention but also make your brand memorable. In order to use images properly, you need to balance the quantity and type of images you’re using. If you can use images to ensure that the announcement you’re making remains top of mind among your readers, then the number of people who convert to paying customers will increase over time.

Let’s talk about five ways in which you can use images in your press release effectively:

1. Use a feature image to grab the reader’s attention right away

Visuals are so common in communication because¬†they attract the viewer’s attention far more effectively than words. By using a feature image, you increase the chances of a reader diving into your press release to find out what it’s about. Nevertheless, you can’t just slap a random feature image on your press release and expect it to work. Make sure the feature image relates to your product or your company in some way. Images that showcase the product or service the press release is about are usually effective. So are images that feature your team member or an interaction between one of your salespeople and a customer. While it may seem like a small thing, it’s important to ensure that your images align with the brand image you’ve developed. Choosing an image that is cohesive with your brand is a great way to tie the whole press release together.

2. Keep the subject of the press release in mind while you write

Including images in your press release may help it stand out, but don’t go crazy.

Consider how each image you include relates to the topic of the article. A press release announcing the launch of a new smartphone should include a flurry of high-quality, attention-grabbing images that will attract journalists’ interest. Even so, unless it’s absolutely essential, avoid adding too many images in your press release. This will keep readers from feeling overwhelmed by your announcement. Remember that quality always trumps quantity.

What if you don’t have any relevant and high-quality images to employ in your article? In this case, your company’s logo will still attract the journalist’s attention and provide them with something to work with when creating your news story. For this reason, we recommend adding your logo to your press release.

3. Make sure that you are not infringing on the intellectual property rights of others by using their work

We’ve all heard of a situation where a business or individual was sued for infringing on copyright law or intellectual property rights. You should do what you can to avoid becoming a statistic in this ever-growing list of offenders. An intellectual property rights lawsuit consumes lots of resources, not to mention the time you will have to dedicate to sorting everything out. Using someone else’s images can have serious consequences if you don’t make sure the images you’re using are explicitly marked as free stock images first. In fact, the use of unlicensed pictures can actually jeopardize your company’s reputation.

To be on the safe side, you should always assume that we have non-exclusive rights to any image you utilize. Before using someone else’s work on your website or blog, buy stock photos or ask the author if you can use their image. Alternatively, you can just opt to take your own high-quality images in-house. It doesn’t cost much to hire a professional photographer to capture special moments or huge milestones at your company. Alternatively, you can pay a graphic designer to create some branded visuals that you can use on other content that you produce. If those options sound too complicated or you don’t want to incur the extra costs, simply use a good phone to take your own photos. Using photos that you’ve produced in-house on your press releases will help you create more authentic connections with your readers.

4. Use infographics to break down complex information

If you’re mentioning statistics in your press release, using infographics can go a long way towards communicating these complex numbers in an easy-to-understand way. When you’re writing a press release, it’s always a good idea to assume your readers are new to the topic that you’re writing about. Simplifying complex information is a good way to make your announcement more digestible for the general public and they will thank you for this. By breaking down complex information, you’re proving that your readers can rely on you to educate them. Ultimately, readers who trust you to educate them are more likely to turn into paying customers.

#4. When sending a press release through email, avoid using picture assets

It’s essential to put yourself in the shoes of the person on the receiving end of your press release at all times. Imagine getting an email with 20 different attachments in the middle of a busy day in the office. Or let’s assume that you’re on the move and you’re reading this email on your phone. Will you take the time to download all those assets? Probably not. If you feel that way, you can expect the journalist who you’re sending your press release email to have similar sentiments.

A journalist’s inbox should not be clogged with email attachments that include large amounts of information, such as pictures or videos (particularly if they are enormous files).

Maybe you feel that the swarm of high-resolution photos in front of you are absolutely essential to the news you’re trying to announce through your press release. If you want to share these photos with the journalist you’re emailing, what are your options?

Instead of attaching files to your press release email, consider the following alternatives:

  1. Offer to send these photos at the journalist’s request – this gives them control over whether they will be receiving these photos or not.
  2. Embed some of these images in the actual press release, but don’t stuff the press release with too many images.
  3. Upload these photos to your newsroom and add the newsroom link to your press release for journalists who want to see more content.

Remember that it’s your job to make the journalist’s job as easy as possible. For this reason, as much as you want to show off all the amazing photos that you have, it’s important to do this in a way that’ll simplify the journalist’s work.

What is the cost of sending a press release with images?

Depending on the press release distributor you decide to work with, you may incur additional expenses for adding visual content to your press release. We don’t blame you if you think this is not the most effective use of your marketing funds. Nevertheless, paying a little extra to include images in your press release is not as extravagant as you might think it is.

In reality, a press release with pictures has been shown to be 7x more likely to be picked up by the media than a press release without images. As you can see, a press release with an image is worth every cent.

Conclusion:

While images might seem like an afterthought, they increase the chances of your press release being published. Once the press release is published, a press release with an image attracts more attention among your target audience and makes a memorable impact on your readers. With a good selection of images, you can ensure that your brand remains top of mind among potential clients.